Norris’ dimensionality of web features on political party websites tested

When analysing the data on web campagining of the EP elections of 2009, I re-analysed the data Pippa Norris was so kind to let me use. My intention was to show the need for testing on multi-dimensionality of a set of indicators. Originally I intended to include the following in the article about EP web campaigning (Vergeer, Hermans & Cunha, 2013), but this was a classic case of ‘killing your darlings’, because the article became too long.
Norris distinguished the two dimensions of Information and Communication a priori, while I wasn’t sure when reviewing the indicators. Some of the indicators didn’t seem to fit the dimensions. For instance, the search function is seen as an indication for communication, whereas this automated feature might also be included to measure informing. To see whether there is different view on the set of indicators, I performed a multiple correspondence analysis (i.e. multivariate cross tabulation (cf. Greenacre, 2007). This resulted in a different dimensional structure. The slide shows that only a small number of web features indicators compose a single dimension[i]. The remaining indicators do not show significant (co-)variance for a second dimension.

Interpreting the dimension shows us that it refers to the presence (right from the origin) and absence of specific web features (left from the origin): the more to the right the more features political parties have on their websites. The second finding is that looking at the labels C (for communication) and I (for information; cf. Norris 2001) these features are randomly scattered across the dimension. This suggests that web features that were assigned to two different dimensions should be merged according to the correspondence analysis. More close inspection also suggests that these features refer to enabling the website visitor to enlist to participate in parties’ activities.
Below the horizontal line, so-called passive variables are presented for descriptive purposes[ii]. Looking at which parties score low or high on the degree of enabling people to participate, we see that it is in particular a) the major and the minor (and not the fringe parties), b) the Green, extreme left, and conservative parties that offer these features more than average. In particular, the liberals and the center parties show below average presence of participation web features.

References:
Greenacre, M. J. (2007). Correspondence analysis in practice. Boca Raton, Fla. ; London: Chapman & Hall/CRC.
Norris, P. (2001). Digital Divide? Civic Engagement, Information Poverty and the Internet Worldwide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Vergeer, M., Hermans, L., & Cunha, C. (2013). Web campaigning in the 2009 European Parliament elections: A cross-national comparative analysis. New Media & Society, 15(1), 128–148. http://doi.org/10.1177/1461444812457337

Notes:
[i] Eigen value = 6.560, Inertia = .205, Cronbach’s α = .875.
‘C’ and ‘I’ indicate the original communication and Information functions as distinguished by Norris (2001).
Categories above the horizontal line belong to variables that influence the dimensional structure. The categories below the horizontal line are supplemental variables that do not influence the dimensionality and are merely included for descriptive purposes.
[ii] Supplementary variables do not influence the dimensionality which arises on the from the analysis on web features (cf. Greenacre, 2007).
 

 

New publication in Sociology Compass

Early September 2015 a new publication of mine was published in Sociology Compass, titled Twitter and Political Campaigning. It is a review article, discussing many approaches of studying the use of Twitter by politicians and citizens during election campaigns. The abstract of the article reads as follows:

The use of Twitter by politicians, parties, and the general audience in politics, particularly during election campaigns, has become an extremely popular research field almost overnight. Even though Twitter, a medium that emerged early in 2006 – the first tweet was posted on 21 March 2006 by Jack Dorsey, co-founder of Twitter – and elections occurring only every few years, it has already received much academic attention. The studies produced are very diverse, ranging from analyzing how politicians or citizens use Twitter, to looking at their activities and the content of political Twitter messages, to network studies of Twitter users. This review will cover many types of studies that characterize the field. The large diversity in the studies conducted on elections will be represented in this review of approaches.

Visit to and Presentation in Shanghai, China

Earlier this year I received an invitation to attend a symposium organized by the Friedrich Ebert Stifting in Shanghai and the Shanghai Administration Institute. To be honest, receiving many invitations and reading this email only superficially, I first thought it was spam email. Luckily I did not yet delete it and a few days later I reread the email and  determining was a very interesting symposium in a very interesting setting. So I decided to accept the invitation, organized the visa for China, I took the plane to Shanghai, spent a few days sensing the city’s spirit and doing some site seeing and enjoying the food and people. Then on Monday I met my fellow presenters from Europe for dinner. For a complete list of presenters in the symposium click here. We had a very nice dinner Chinese style. I must say that after having worked some time in South Korea, I really got hooked on Asian food, whether it’s Korean, Japanese, or Chinese or Thai, when prepared well, it’s all delicious, even though some of it is an acquired taste.

Then on Tuesday morning, after having taken the group photo, the symposium titled “Transforming societies – transforming political parties” started. The program was a mix of Western scholars as well as scholars from China talking about  online political communication, political science and politics. The entire program will be available shortly from the website of the Friedrich Ebert Stifting.

There was a mix of political communication presentations and political science presentations. Those on political communication were provided by Rachel Gibson from Machester University in the UK and myself. Rachel Gibson talked about her project at Manchester University, and was titled “Social and Technological Trends and their Effects on Parties in the Western World”. One of here main studies was published in the New Media and Society special issue on “The state of online campaigning in politics”, titled “Party organizational change and ICTs: The growth of a virtual grassroots?” . I was the second international speaker, talking about “New Media – New Engaging Politcs? Personalization and Mediatization in Politics” It was based on published and and onging research . First I talked about changing ways of conducting elections campaigns which is based on Norris’  and Gibson and Römmele’s work . I then presented some results of prior published on the personalization in European Parliaments Elections that took place in 2009 (Hermans & Vergeer, 2013). I finished my presentation with some preliminary findings of a comparison of Twitter political Twitter networks in five countries (Japan, South Korea, the Netherlands, the UK and Canada). I am not going to write about that too much right now, because – as said – this project is still in progress.

Having worked and stayed somewhat longer periods in Asia but never in China, I decided to book a couple of days extra. Staying at a hotel in the French Concession, it was very easy to walk the streets leading either to Nanjing Road West or to Huaihai Road. From there it’s easy to take the very efficient and cheap subway system to travel across this vast city. In part I behaved like a true tourist sightseeing the main attractions. However I also like the parks where regular people like to go. I particularly liked Lu Xun Park and the Duolun neighborhood where Chinese writers lived.
After acting the tourist and relaxing in the hotel room watching some TV I noticed that on Chinese TV, the audition programs are very popular: every evening there is a “Chinese Idol” broadcast or a “So You Think You Can Dance” program. These programs strictly follow the formats as imposed by the producers. They also have HBO Asia, at least in the hotel, which I didn’t know existed. There are of course also many Chinese movie channels with historical movies and martial arts. Of course these are the channels available at my hotel. The regular channel package for people is sure to differ from this.

Of course, another thing I noticed, although I was already aware of Google’s disputes with China’s government, is that Google services did not work in Shanghai. Gmail and Google Maps on my Android phone did not work out of the box. A small workaround, using a VPN, solved this issue. Interestingly, Google Maps information on restaurants and traffic information was up-to-date and realtime, suggesting that many more people use Google. Otherwise, Google information should be outdated quite quickly, particularly the information on traffic congestion.

On that topic, it’s a bit of a shame to find yourself in Shanghai and encounter similar TV programs, the same coffee shops (e.g. Starbucks) and the same clothing shops (e.g. H&M and UNIQLO). That’s not why I travel the world. I want to be surprised and learn and taste new things. At the same time anime, manga and cosplay are enjoying increased popularity in the west as well. Whether this will balance out, meaning that specific cultural elements wil remain is unclear.

It’s almost as if it’s not the governments anymore that run the countries, but it’s the multinational companies like Ikea, H&M, UNIQLO, Starbucks, McDonalds, Burger King etc. Besides their increasing economic power, it leads to an increasing homogenization of culture. It really takes away the fun of traveling, of being surprised by the culture and the local customs. Still, this mainly applies to the city centers of large cities. When you venture in to neighborhoods some five or more subway stations away from the tourist center, you’ll be surprised how little English they understand, and see that the chance of encountering a Starbucks rapidly decrease.

But let’s be clear, do not be bothered by this when considering going to Shanghai. Go, you´ll enjoy it. There’s enough new things to experience. The only thing is you have to put somewhat more effort into it. That’s easy enough if you’re willing to take a 11 hour flight from Europe to get there in the first place. For me it was definitely worthwhile. Then, on Saturday evening Shanghai time – after a hellish taxi ride due to a very sleepy taxi driver – I flew back to the Netherlands and arrived at my home doorstep at 7:30AM local time.

A great thank you goes to Catherina Schläger, Judith Christ, Florian Sladky and Yan Yu representing the Friedrich Ebert Stifting in Shanghai for organizing this symposium in collaboration with the Shanghai Administration Institute.